History of online dating


To court means to woo and to woo means to seek the love of another with marriage in mind.Imagine a 13-year-old girl and a 15-year-old boy sitting down to discuss their marriage plans.Male settlers came by themselves and when they needed wives, the French crown sent over women by the shipload.When the ship arrived at the port, men would meet their brides and become engaged, if not married on the spot.The courting then took up the first month of marriage.Through courting, the couple became acquaintances, then friends, gained mutual respect and hopefully the love that would sustain them through married life.Often following the betrothal were a few weeks to a few years of courting or dating.In some cases, however, the first meeting of the couple might be the very day of the wedding.



There was no time for frivolity–practicality was of the essence.Courting wasn’t something young people did merely for a good time; it was a serious family business proposition.Surprisingly, the main players in the marriage process often weren’t just the bride and groom; they were the parents of the bride and groom.The point is, a marriage is a joining of two families as well as two young people.

Few choices and no time to date People may assume that arranged marriages were loveless matches, with frightened young people forced into lives of emotional pain and forbidding loneliness, but such was not always the case.

Tie adjusted, box and bouquet retrieved, he clears his throat again. No, he’s getting ready for the culmination of months of planning, supervised outings, amiable family dinners, walks in the park with the young lady, conversation in a parlor warmed by an autumn fire and, lastly, a brief, but serious chat with the young woman’s father. Within the confines of courting, appropriate one-on-one dating played an important role; two people of marriageable age got to know one another better, their personalities, interests and so forth, before they made a more serious decision regarding marriage.